Normal Mom Worry VS. Postpartum Anxiety - Happy as a Mother

Normal Mom Worry VS. Postpartum Anxiety


with Therapist Kate Borsato



We know that becoming a parent will bring worry and anxiety. It comes with the territory.  You’ve never been responsible for something more important than this tiny human you are now caring for. But where is the line between normal amounts of worry and paralyzing amounts of anxiety? Do you worry and wonder whether it takes up to much of your focus? Do you get very stuck in over researching what is “right”? The thing is, anxiety shows up in many different ways. The key is to be aware that something isn’t right and seeking help when it’s disrupting your ability to enjoy motherhood. In this episode, Kate and I discuss the differences between normal parenting worry and postpartum anxiety, how anxiety shows up in our lives, and when you should seek help.

Kate Borsato is a mom of two daughters and lives on Vancouver Island, Canada. She works as a mental health therapist and online educator for women as they transition to motherhood. After experiencing anxiety and depression herself, Kate is driven to help other women develop self-compassion as they work through the often surprising obstacles of becoming moms. She loves to encourage women to remember themselves during this busy stage of life, to set their own expectations of what a “good” mom means, and to surrender to the bumpy ride that motherhood brings. 


WHAT YOU’LL LEARN


  • The difference between fear, worry, and anxiety
  • What anxiety looks like
  • How normal mom worry and postpartum anxiety differ
  • When to seek support for postpartum anxiety
  • The effect trauma has

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PODCAST


  1. […] Normal Mom Worry Vs. Postpartum Anxiety podcast episode […]

  2. […] NORMAL MOM WORRY VS. POSTPARTUM ANXIETY […]

  3. […] in 5 moms suffer from a postpartum mood disorder, and 40% of those moms are walking around undiagnosed and untreated, feeling like they are failing. […]

  4. […] But if you’re having to evaluate and research every choice you make, you can take a step back and think about how much anxiety you’re having. If the anxiety is obsessive, you might want to get […]

  5. […] easy. It also meant facing an eviction, career changes, and changes to her own mental health—mental health changes after having a baby are normal even without all of the external factors she struggled through—with a three-month-old. […]

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